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20120901
20120930
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on drugs? >> if you look at the timing, of the war in iraq happened, and then we started spending more time talking about the war on iraq and afghanistan, and the war on drugs was no longer front and center. no powerful interest group wanting to end the insanity of the war on france -- drugs. that is leading to half a million people going to jail for non-of violent and drug offenses, and the result of incarceration rates is we have millions of people who are felons and disenfranchised for life, so the unintended consequences are enormous and long-lasting, and what is interesting is the people are ahead of the politicians. over 90% of people believe treatment is more affective, and yet politicians are worried they are going to be perceived as weak on crime. they are continuing to fight a war we are never going to win. >> the third issue covered at these shadow conventions beyond poverty and drugs is a corrupt and -- is the corruption of politics by money. i cannot imagine -- i wish i were there to hear the conversations going on about money in politics this time around to given the supreme c
of mass destruction were never found in iraq. good his foreign policy centered on going into iraq and getting rid of those weapons of mass destruction was alive. his administration showed remarkable indifference to the plight of most americans. what happened in new orleans and katrina is a good example. mitt romney and the republicans would like to pretend the and ministration did not happen. taking a five trillion $10-year surplus bequeaths to it by the clinton administration and turning into a a giant new deficit and saying to wall street, do whatever you want. we are not going to look at you. he makes the case against mitt romney. that is one of the most important things. and with that kind of cynicism, the special interests to win everything. the only thing we can get our democracy back is if we understand we have got to be active, and it is not just paying taxes and serving on juries and showing up. we have got to be engaged, mobilize, energized. we have got to demand this work for us as ordinary people, as average working americans who need an economy working for us, not jus
, iraq, katrina. 250,000 people under the rubble, 80% of the people living on less than $2 a day. wet was the greatest asset possess? human capital. i said, who is going to negotiate with these people. i have been wearing my flag to get a group of people to pay attention to this country. this is the time there is a soft spot and they feel week. who is going to be there for better policies and legislation? i felt with my passion and the youth behind me, i was the man for the job. tavis: there were some technical issues that kept you from running, but how did you perceive the efforts to keep you from the ballot? >> i got bamboozled. not in the sense of being emotional, and in a sense of the law. i was a diplomat five years prior to the current president now, who is a friend of mine with a diplomatic passport, and my title was ambassador at large, so the residency laws do not really apply, because how would you give me a five-year passports if i am not a haitian citizen? the same goes for my uncle who also ran and was also bamboozled, so i want you to understand the reason i did not figh
in a military operation in a place like syria, you've got to be prepared, as we learned from iraq and afghanistan, to become the government, and i'm not sure any country, either the united states or i don't hear of anyone else, who's willing to take on that responsibility. the other proposal is to arm the opposition. that's certainly something you can look at, but make sure you know who you're arming and what you're liable to get from that solution. then provide safe havens for people in other countries may be a possibility, but i think stick with the political, diplomatic and economic track for the time being. tavis: again, i'm so tempted to continue picking your brain about these hotspots around the globe, but want to, again, as i promised, get to the text. there are a number of things, a number of political issues, for that matter, decisions that you've made in your life that you finally open up and talk about in the text, which allows me to some degree to continue this line of questioning. for example, you talked for the first time extensively about the un speech, and everybod
, with pandemic, with terrorism, and george bush went to take on iraq and afghanistan. al qaeda is nothing more than an interdependent ngo of a very pernicious kind. tavis: interdependence, we heard some of this at the rnc, and we have heard some of that at the democratic convention this week, but speak to me about this notion, this gospel of american exceptionalism that some americans are still preaching. >> tavis, that is such an important question. politicians have to do it. when president obama was elected, he had made a speech where he talked about america is part of the world, and he went to istanbul and cairo in his first year and talked about independence and the need to work together, and he was punished by the media and his own party, and the result is he talks mainly about america, we are number one, god bless america, and i do one god to bless america, but i want them to bless the whole world. the focus on the american exhibition where, first of all, every nation thinks it is exceptional. in switzerland, they talk about it, and in france, they talk about it that the french think sim
resentment of the various foreign wars that are being waged, iraq, for example, the dropo killings, all of that kind of stuff, but i think the anger comes from more profound sources been bet. these are people usually in places where the young men, almost all of them really have no prospects. no jobs. they have very little chance of making a good living for themselves, getting married, so there is a frustration, and that frustration is easily channeled by political leaders. they can be named. it becomes like letting off steam. tavis: we are heading into these presidential debates. one of these debates, it will be dealing with foreign policy, and we have already seen how mr. obama and mr. romney have responded. with libya and other parts of the world. what is your sense that they need to calibrate the situation going forward? >> it is a difficult thing for america, because i think it is very important to hold the line. it is important to say we have some fundamental freedoms in this country that we cherish and that we are not going to bat down from that. it is very important to say that w
shortly after the invasion of iraq. it was a "living with war" album which is, for me, a brilliant masterpiece musically, narratively, thematically, but a tremendously political album, if being against war is political. by the way, is it? i mean, is that a political position? tavis: i think it's a moral position. >> i do too. so neil had to write that. you're right. i feel like we've got so many gifted musicians today and it'd be wonderful if they would come forth and give us stuff to relate to. tavis: one could look at your corpus and come to the conclusion that you are a lover of music and that your music tastes are eclectic. one the one hand, you've done neil young work, on the other hand, bob marley stuff. you really do love music that much? >> very, very much. you know, my generation's early days of television, so i've been thinking about this lately. my two flashes of me as a little boy, one, i'm standing in front of the radio freaking out that nat king cole's singing "lady of spain," just this stuff coming out of the radio, and guy williams singing "wild horses" coming out o
was on to some extent the transition with wars in iraq and afghanistan. we quickly got on to the economy. the process of building the work for building the recovery act was monumental and it occurred quite rapidly and i think the one question that i still wrestle with in my mind is, did -- we were in the process of doing a lot of different things and the repeat idaholy with which the recovery act went through and sort of getting away from it i think didn't really help educate the public about what they were likely to experience and what the story line and narrative was. so we kind of -- the administration kind of moved on quickly to other priorities which we had prepared in the administration particularly the health care. in retrospect we didn't have good answers to the housing crisis and we didn't stay on that economic argument about job creation long enough really. >> charlie:back in a moment. stay with us krsmght we continuel analysis. john harris of politico and jeff disel any of the new york times. i'm meesed to of them here. where are we in terms of democratic party having a remark
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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